Tag Archives: new word

New words to live by: “Slug monkey”

Time, once again (though it has been a while), for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, tantrumony, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two nouns and creating a new word. In this instance, the new word does not borrow from the names of the old words, but from their definitions. Without further waiting here is the new word: slug monkey.

OLD WORDS
Slug, n. Any one of various snaillike gastropods having no shell or only a rudimentary one. It feeds off plants and is often a pest to garden crops, often leaving a viscus trail.

v. Chiefly journalism. To furnish copy, article, story, with a slug.

Monkey, n. Any mammal of the order Primates, including guenons, langurs, capuchins, and macaques, but excluding humans and the anthropoid apes.

v. Informal. To play or trifle; sometimes to fool or screw up as in monkey with.

NEW WORD
Slug monkey, n. A sycophant, spokesperson, or follower repeating or defending the illogical ramblings, stupid pomposity, or uttered and written lies of a leader.

v. The act of uttering or repeating the illogical ramblings, stupid pomposity, or uttered and written lies.

Used in a sentence: Noun. The US Senator is nothing more than a slug monkey for the President.

Verb. The press conference was a chance for the President to slug monkey his position.

Most recent new word: clustrophobia.

Slug monkey

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New words to live by: “Clusterphobia”

Time, once again (though it has been a while), for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, tantrumony, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two nouns and creating a new word. In this instance, the new word does not borrow from the names of the old words, but from their definitions.Without further waiting here is the new word: clusterphobia.

OLD WORDS
Claustrophobia, n. An abnormal fear of being in enclosed or narrow places.

Cluster, n. A group of persons or thing close together.

NEW WORD
Clusterphobia, n. Too many people or things gathered in too close or small a space eliciting a fear bordering on abnormal.

Adjective version: clusterphobic.

Used in a sentence: Donnie was afflicted by clusterphobia. He had too many people too close by who knew too much more than he did and he couldn’t stand it, so he fired them.

Most recent new word: tantrumony.

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Filed under 2018, new word, New words to live by

New words to live by: “Tantrumony”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two nouns and creating a new word. In this instance, the new word does not borrow from the names of the old words, but from their definitions.Without further waiting here is the new word: tantrumony.

OLD WORDS
Ego, n. There are several definitions for this word, but the one we are most interested in is: conceit, self-importance, egotism.

Attitude, n. There are several definitions for this word, but the one we are most interested in is: manner, disposition, feeling, position, etc., with regard to a person or thing; tendency or orientation, especially of the mind.

NEW WORD
Tantrumony, n. 1) The dysfunctional marriage of ego and attitude. 2) An attitude of extreme self-importance.

A person so showing this condition is called a tantrumonist.

Used in a sentence: Don was the perfect example of “always wrong, but never in doubt.” When challenged on this point, he had a perfect tantrumony, blaming those who challenged him with conspiring to see him fail.

Most recent new word: furture.

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New words to live by: “Blundermouth”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two nouns and creating a new word. Without further waiting and just in time for spring, blundermouth.

OLD WORDS
Blunder, n. Gross, stupid, careless, thoughtless mistake.

Mouth, n. The opening through which a human speaks, or utters words and sounds.

NEW WORD
Blundermouth, n. the act of uttering or speaking gross, stupid, careless, or thoughtless speech. Often do to a lack of concern for the information or the person being spoken to. Blundermouth can also be a verb.

Used in a sentence: Once again the U.S. President was a blundermouth, speaking openly of classified information about Russia while the press, the Russian diplomat, and other senior Russian officials where in the room. When asked about it, the White House Press Secretary replied, “The President blundermouths all the time. He considers his duty to do so to the fake media.”

Most recent new word: furture.

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New words to live by: “Furture”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two nouns and creating a new word. Without further waiting and just in time for the new year, furture.

OLD WORDS
Furniture, n. 1. the moveable articles, such as desks, tables, chairs, beds, sofas, etc., required for decorating a house, apartment, office, or some similar space. 2. apparatus, fittings, or accessories for something.

Future, n. time that is to be or come hereafter. Not past. Not present.

NEW WORD
Furture, n. all the moveable objects, fittings, and other baggage brought from the past through the present and into the future. For example, a grudge.

Used in a sentence: Despite Bob’s claims that this new year was going to be fresh start, he always brought with him too much furture to make the future a fresh start. In particular, he still polished a grudge against his ex-wife that he could not let go, and that was only one of the pieces of the past that he drug through the present and into the future like a piece of old, ratty furniture scratching against a hardwood floor.

Most recent new word: grungle.

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Filed under 2017, New words to live by

New words to live by: “Grungle”

Chair in the last bookshopTime, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two verbs and creating a new word. Without further waiting, grungle.

OLD WORD
Grumble, v. utter discontent, murmur sullenly, complain with indistinct sounds.

Bungle, v. perform or work inadequately or clumsily.

NEW WORD
Grungle, v. uttering discontent or murmuring sullenly while performing work inadequately or clumsily. Often blaming somebody else for your inadequacies. Can be in written form, such as a tweet.

Other forms of the word:
Grungler, n. = person who grungles.

 

Most recent new word: shanging.

 

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New words to live by: “White liners”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking an adjective and a noun and creating a compound word. Without further waiting, white liner.

OLD WORD
White, adj. Reflecting nearly all the rays of sunlight or a similar light. For example, new snow. The margins of many printed pages.

Line, n. A mark or stroke ling in proportion to its breadth, often made with a pen, crayon, marker, pencil, or other tool on a surface. For example, the white lines on a highway dividing two lanes.

NEW WORD
White liner, n. 1. Any person or thing that crowds the margins or marked edges or lanes of a highway. For example, a person who rides the white center lines of a highway. Or, somebody who parks right on the line of a parking space.

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Filed under 2017, new word, New words to live by