Tag Archives: new word

New words to live by: “Furture”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two nouns and creating a new word. Without further waiting and just in time for the new year, furture.

OLD WORDS
Furniture, n. 1. the moveable articles, such as desks, tables, chairs, beds, sofas, etc., required for decorating a house, apartment, office, or some similar space. 2. apparatus, fittings, or accessories for something.

Future, n. time that is to be or come hereafter. Not past. Not present.

NEW WORD
Furture, n. all the moveable objects, fittings, and other baggage brought from the past through the present and into the future. For example, a grudge.

Used in a sentence: Despite Bob’s claims that this new year was going to be fresh start, he always brought with him too much furture to make the future a fresh start. In particular, he still polished a grudge against his ex-wife that he could not let go, and that was only one of the pieces of the past that he drug through the present and into the future like a piece of old, ratty furniture scratching against a hardwood floor.

Most recent new word: grungle.

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New words to live by: “Grungle”

Chair in the last bookshopTime, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking two verbs and creating a new word. Without further waiting, grungle.

OLD WORD
Grumble, v. utter discontent, murmur sullenly, complain with indistinct sounds.

Bungle, v. perform or work inadequately or clumsily.

NEW WORD
Grungle, v. uttering discontent or murmuring sullenly while performing work inadequately or clumsily. Often blaming somebody else for your inadequacies. Can be in written form, such as a tweet.

Other forms of the word:
Grungler, n. = person who grungles.

 

Most recent new word: shanging.

 

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New words to live by: “White liners”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by taking an adjective and a noun and creating a compound word. Without further waiting, white liner.

OLD WORD
White, adj. Reflecting nearly all the rays of sunlight or a similar light. For example, new snow. The margins of many printed pages.

Line, n. A mark or stroke ling in proportion to its breadth, often made with a pen, crayon, marker, pencil, or other tool on a surface. For example, the white lines on a highway dividing two lanes.

NEW WORD
White liner, n. 1. Any person or thing that crowds the margins or marked edges or lanes of a highway. For example, a person who rides the white center lines of a highway. Or, somebody who parks right on the line of a parking space.

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New words to live by: “Awesomocity”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by combing an adjective and a noun. Without further waiting, Awesomocity.

OLD WORDS
Awesome, adj. 1. Inspiring an overwhelming feeling of reverence, admiration, or fear. 2. Exhibiting or marked by awe.

Velocity, n. 1. Swiftness, speed, rapidity of motion. 2. Mechanics. The rate of change of position of a body in a specified direction.

NEW WORD
Awesomocity, n. The speed and direction with which your awesomeness becomes known to others.

His awesomocity was so fast and complete, it was almost impossible to tell where it began and where it ended. It seemed to be instantaneous: everywhere and all at once.

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New words to live by: “Falsetto light”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by combing sound and light. Without further waiting, Falsetto light.

OLD WORDS
Falsetto, n. 1) an unnaturally or artificially high-pitched voice or register, especially in a man. 2) a person, especially a man, who sings with such a voice.

Light, n. 1) something that makes things visible or affords illumination: all colors depend on light.
2) Physics.
1. electromagnetic radiation to which the organs of sight react, ranging in wavelength from about 400 to 700 nm and propagated at a speed of 186,282 mi./sec (299,972 km/sec), considered variously as a wave, corpuscular, or quantum phenomenon.
2. a similar form of radiant energy that does not affect the retina, as ultraviolet or infrared rays.

NEW WORD
Falsetto light, n. 1) an unnaturally or artificially high-pitched light or focus shining obsessively on something trivial, unimportant, or misdirected at the expense of losing focus on more important. For example, focusing on missing car keys while the car is being stolen. 2) To loudly trumpet or lay claim to an accomplishment you had little to do with and have little right to claim.

In a sentence: By using falsetto light, the candidate was able to make the press the issue instead of the questions the press was asking that the candidate was not answering.

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New words to live by: “Spam fat”

Time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by combing a sound and a noun. Without further waiting, Spam fat.

OLD WORDS
Spam, v. Original a noun meant to name a food product consisting mostly of pork and formed into a block, in the digital/computer age it became a verb meaning to inundate people with unwanted e-mails, text messages, possibly even kitten photos.

Fat, n. That adipose material that shows up on your body when and where you least want, often, but not exclusively, around the fall and winter holidays.

NEW WORD
Spam fat, n. 1. That adipose material that shows up too often and too quickly because you are being inundated with too many goodies in too short a space of time. 2. Too many e-mails in too short of time offering you last-minute gifts to buy, parties to attend, and photos of parties to which you didn’t attend or weren’t invited. This also includes post-holiday spam fat offering you ways to lose those “extra holiday pounds.”

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New words to live by: “Cackle pants”

It is time, once again, for New words to live by. This is a word or phrase not currently in use in the U.S. English lexicon, but might need to be considered. Other words, such as obsurd, crumpify, subsus, flib, congressed, and others, can be found by clicking on the tags below. Today’s New Word is created by combing a sound and a noun. Without further waiting, Cackle pants.

OLD WORDS
Cackle, v. 1. To chatter noisily; prattle. 2. Laugh in a broken, shrill manner. 3. To utter a broken, shrill sound or cry, like a hen.

Pants, n. A loose- (or sometime tight-) fitting garment for the lower part of the body with leg portions that usually reach the ankle.

NEW WORD
Cackle pants, n. 1. The sound of slightly stiff new pants, particularly wool, worn for the first time. Sometimes accompanied by static electricity sparks. 2. Somebody who has noisy flatulence. Don’t mind, Uncle Bob, he’s a bit ripe, but that’s because he’s a cackle pants. 3. A politician or person seeking public office who speaks in platitudes, generalities, banalities, conspiracies, circular or empty rhetoric. Sometimes demeaning and often predicting dire consequences if not elected.

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