Tag Archives: Knoxville Writers’ Guild

2017 Knoxville Writers’ Guild Contest

Preamble

“Home is where the heart is.” – Proverb

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relatives.”
– Oscar Wilde, A Woman of No Importance

As the shadows lengthen and the verdure of summer yellows and browns, thoughts turn to the approach of cooler weather, longer nights, and our families. For many of us the start of the new school year conjures gilded memories of childhood. Increasingly, Halloween kicks off the holiday season by letting our imaginations dabble in alternative realities: costumes, masks, hauntings, and mazes let us self-determine the constructs of our lives, at least for an evening. We disguise ourselves and play tricks on one another before the formalities and traditions of Thanksgiving and the winter holidays order our hours, days, and weeks. Throughout autumn the idea of family moves closer and closer to the center of our thoughts and activities. And as it does, we reflect on ourselves in relation to others with whom we share the moniker ‘family’.

With this in mind, the Knoxville Writers’ Guild is opening its first Autumn Writing Contest with ‘Family’ as the theme. We are inviting submissions that examine the complex nature of families and our relationships with those deemed closest to us by culture, society, and blood.

2017  Knoxville Writers’ Guild Autumn Contest

The Knoxville Writers Guild is accepting submissions for the its first Autumn Knoxville Writers Guild Contest beginning August 31, 2017 through midnight, October 31, 2017.

Contestants may enter their work in several categories including poetry, literary nonfiction and literary short fiction. There is also a Young Writers category in which student may submit in any of the previously mentioned genres. Judges will be announced shortly.

Please direct questions regarding the contest here.

Literary Short Fiction

Guidelines:
Entry consists of one short story totaling no more than 3,000 words. See General Guidelines for additional instructions.
Members: Free
Non-Members: $30

Poetry

Guidelines:
Entry consists of no more than three typed poems totaling 100 lines or fewer. If more than one poem is entered on the same submission, poems will be judged as a collection. There are no restrictions as far as style, content or spacing.
See General Guidelines.
Members: Free
Non-Members: $30

Literary Nonfiction

Guidelines:
Entry consists of one typed, double-spaced nonfiction essay of no more than 3,000 words.
See General Guidelines.
Members: Free
Non-Members: $30

 

Young Writers
Open to all students grades 7 through 12 of Knox and adjoining counties.

Guidelines:
Fiction: Entry consists of one short story or stand-alone novel excerpt totaling no more than 3,000 words, double-spaced.
Nonfiction: Entry consists of essay totaling no more than 3,000 words, double-spaced.
Poetry: Up to a maximum of three typed poems totaling 100 lines or fewer with no restrictions as far as style, content or spacing.  Poems should be submitted as a single document. Poems will be judged as a collection.

Do not include any identifying information on the submissions themselves.

If you are a teacher or school submitting entries on behalf of your students, please add the following information in addition to the information required by the General Guidelines:

  • School name
  • Teacher or school representative name
  • School Address
  • School phone number

Please contact us if your school or club needs any additional information for bookkeeping or payment purposes.
Students: Free

Complete guidelines for the entries can be found here.

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Photo finish Friday: “Shameless self-promotion, part2”

After some delays, the 1st Place Check for the Knoxville Writers' Guild Science Fiction and Fantasy writing contest arrived. The 2015 KWG writing contest is now accepting submissions. Go to http://www.knoxvillewritersguild.org/contest.

After some delays, the 1st Place Check for the Knoxville Writers’ Guild Science Fiction and Fantasy writing contest arrived. The 2015 KWG writing contest is now accepting submissions. Go to http://www.knoxvillewritersguild.org/contest.

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Filed under 2015, photo by David E. Booker, Photo Finish Friday

Some shameless self-promotion

Booker, McGinley win Writers’ Guild awards

Source: http://www.standardbanner.com/news/booker-mcginley-win-writers-guild-awards/article_87118cd4-bd2b-11e4-ba8a-b37639bc4d99.html

By Gayle Page – Staff Writer

David E. Booker -- lost in the cosmos, as always.

David E. Booker — lost in the cosmos, as always.

A couple of expressive gentlemen with local connections have recently won literary awards for their creative writing. David Booker and Mark McGinley achieved first-place recognition from the Knoxville Writers’ Guild through its annual writing contest.

Booker, a Jefferson City native, won a first place for the second chapter of a science fiction/fantasy thriller that he calls a “work in progress.” This was not Booker’s first Writers’ Guild win. He won last year for a short story in the mystery genre.

Booker has written and published several short stories, and he has been a contributor to a few area newspapers, including the Morristown Citizen Tribune.

He earns his living as a writer, currently doing technical writing for Y-12. Earlier, he did technical and promotional consumer writing for Phillips Electronics (formerly Magnavox), and has done some promotional writing for Log Home magazines, as well. For the past three years Booker has served as editor of his neighborhood newsletter, and he continues working on his novel.

About writing Booker says: “It’s what I enjoy doing, even though sometimes I sit frustrated in front of a blank screen.” He is a long-time member of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild, and invites other interested writers to join and enjoy the support of an active, dedicated and diverse writing community.

Mark McGinley, another former resident of Jefferson City who is now Assistant Professor of Theater and Technical Director of Stage Design at Lincoln Memorial University, is also a winner of the Knoxville Writers’ Guild 2014 contest.

McGinley’s writing primarily focuses on his work as a playwright. His winning entry “Still Waters,” is a one-act play set in the Tennessee hills in the 1930’s, with a ragtag cast of characters and a moonshine theme. It hasn’t been performed on stage yet, but whenever that happens, the 32-page script will take actors about 30 minutes to execute.

He has had one play entitled “Sold” performed by a theater workshop group (now disbanded), but McGinley still has plenty of other ideas and plays he hopes to produce. It’s possible that one of his plays will be performed at the Tiger Lily Theater in Knoxville, in April.

McGinley earned his undergraduate degree at Carson-Newman University, and while he lived nearby he worked for the Comedy Barn in Pigeon Forge and doubled as a massage therapist. Today he stays so busy he only has time to concentrate on his primary vocation, which is theater. He received his graduate degree, a masters in theater design and stage combat, from Louisiana Tech.

About writing McGinley says: “It’s hard work until you come up with an idea that burns inside of you until you put it on a page. Then it’s more work, work, work.”

Of course, he would never want to do anything else.
Finishing first earned Booker and McGinley $100 each in prize money. Aspiring writers who might be interested in joining the Knoxville Writers Guild are invited to go online to http://www.knoxvillewritersguild.org and see what they have to offer, or write to them for an informational brochure, at Knoxville Writers’ Guild, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville TN 37939-032.

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2014 Contest | Knoxville Writers’ Guild

2014 Contest | Knoxville Writers' Guild.

Still time to enter. Deadline has been extended to August 15th.

Categories include Creative Nonfiction, Crime/Mystery. Science Fiction/Fantasy, Novel Except, One Act Play, Short Story, Poetry, Romance, Screenwriting, Young Writer’s Fiction Prize, and Young Writer’s Poetry Prize.

Details located at: http://www.knoxvillewritersguild.org/contest

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Writing tip Wednesday: “Character Dimensions and Sketch”

On Saturday, February 1, 2014, I took a workshop sponsored by the Knoxville Writers’ Guild (www.knoxvillewritersguild.org) and led by nationally published author Pamela Schoenewaldt (www.PamelaSchoenewaldt.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pamela-Schoenewaldt/158580547517755?ref=tn_tnmn).

Answering questions beforehand could save you heartburn later.

Answering questions beforehand could save you heartburn later.

The workshop was on character development. What you have below is the third of the three handout exercises from the workshop. The first one, “Who are you?” was posted two Wednesdays ago. The second one, “Conflict Worksheet” was posted last Wednesday.

Each previous worksheet / exercise could be done in ten minutes or less, and oftentimes not pondering too long is best. This worksheet may take a little longer, but like the others can be used for the both the protagonist and antagonist of the story or novel you are working on, or just about any character you want to use it on. It might also be helpful if writing a memoir or biography.

CHARACTER SKETCH EXERCISE

Answer without worrying about grammar or logic.
• NAME your character

• LEARN your character by considering these dimension (writing notes on each or most is ideal)

• REMEMBER that your goal is a rounded character (not all good or bad) with a capacity for moving action.

• SKIP dimensions which repeat information.

• BEWARE of main characters who are very young, psychotics, or whose condition severely restricts their capacity for change.

• KNOW everything about this person.

CHARACTER DIMENSIONS

1. Age, physical appearance and attitude to body.

2. Significant health issues.

3. Distinctive physical signs: scars, handicaps, beauties, tics, tattoos, gestures.

4. Manner of speaking (level of language, accent, peculiarities). Manner of dress.

5. Living situation (where, with whom, how living space reflects character).

6. Socio-economic level and attitude to this level (satisfied, indifferent, ambitious?).

7. Work/ profession/ main activity.

8. Performance in Work/ profession/ main activity.

9. Sexuality and relationship to it (fears, doubts, longings, obsessions).

10. Quality of childhood.

11. Current relationship with family – how does it affect the person?

12. Significant intimate relationships and how they reflect the person.

13. What friends does character have? Attitude to friends, their attitudes to him/her.

14. Significant interests, hobbies, passions, obsessions.

15. Religious/spiritual practice and faith.

16. Fundamental belief about life/self (“The most important thing is . . . “)

17. How does the way the character sees him/her self compare to others’ views of him/her?

18. Major strength (include hidden strengths which could be mobilized).

19. Major success/failure or secret of past. (Any significant patterns?)

20. Typical way of dealing with stress or crisis… (Does it work? Should it change?)

21. Major weakness and fear.

22. Ambitions and blocks to achievement.

23. Shaping force/person/event of past.

24. What is not working for your character now?

25. What would your character sacrifice or fight for?

26. Where does your character experience a major conflict in values?

27. Where does your character draw the line: s/he wouldn’t do this….

28. What might push your character up to the line?

29. What conflict, choice or crisis faces the character now?

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Writing tip Wednesday: “Conflict”

On Saturday, February 1, 2014, I took a workshop sponsored by the Knoxville Writers’ Guild (www.knoxvillewritersguild.org) and led by nationally published author Pamela Schoenewaldt (www.PamelaSchoenewaldt.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pamela-Schoenewaldt/158580547517755?ref=tn_tnmn).

Even a friendly game of cards might harbor some conflict.

Even a friendly game of cards might harbor some conflict.

The workshop was on character development. What you have below is the second of the three handout exercises from the workshop. The first one, “Who are you?” was posted last Wednesday. Each handout can be done in ten minutes or less, and oftentimes not pondering too long is best. The first exercise was called “Who are you?” The you refers to the character. This worksheet can be used for the both the protagonist and antagonist of the story or novel you are working on, or just about any character you want to use it on. It might even be helpful if writing a memoir or biography.

CONFLICT WORKSHEET

Answer without worrying about grammar or logic. Emotions can be messy and illogical. The point is that they MATTER.

1. More than anything, my character wants. . .

2. Getting it matters so much because . . .

3. But the problem/obstacle is . . .

4. My character feels (use 4+ adjectives)

5. Giving up would mean . . .

6. To “win” the character must overcome . . .

7. Who will help and how?

8. Name 3 possible LOCATIONS where this conflict will play out. What OBJECTS will be important?

9. The outcome/ resolution will change the character. Now s/he will . . .

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Writing tip Wednesday: “Who are you?”

On Saturday, February 1, 2014, I took a workshop sponsored by the Knoxville Writers’ Guild (www.knoxvillewritersguild.org) and led by nationally published author Pamela Schoenewaldt (www.PamelaSchoenewaldt.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pamela-Schoenewaldt/158580547517755?ref=tn_tnmn).

The workshop was on character development. What you have below is one of the three handout exercises from the workshop. I will be posting the others over time. Each handout can be done in ten minutes or less, and oftentimes not pondering too long is best. The first exercise is called “Who are you?” The you refers to the character. This worksheet can be used for the both the protagonist and antagonist of the story or novel you are working on, or just about any character you want to use it on. It might even be helpful if writing a memoir or biography.

WHO ARE YOU?

Your name is . . .

Your age is . . .

I can see that you are . . . (location)

And you’re looking at . . .

And you’re feeling . . . .

Your great strength is . . . .

Your fear or weakness is . . . .

It’s too bad that . . . .

You’d really laugh if . . . .

Most people don’t know that you . . .

Very soon you must . . . .

The challenge will be . . . .

You will get strength from . . . .

Looking in your eyes, I know that . . .

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