Tag Archives: agent

Monday morning writing joke: “Offer”

Author to his agent: “What’s the latest on my manuscript?”

Agent to author: “I sent it out to six publishers at the same time hoping to stir up the most interest in the shortest amount of time. But no response yet.”

Author, thinking the agent is trying to start a bidding war for his masterpiece. “Maybe you’re asking too much.”

Agent to author: “I offered it to them for free.”

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Writing tip Wednesday: “New agent to consider”

Quressa Robinson of D4EO Literary

Source: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/new-literary-agent-alert-quressa-robinson-d4eo-literary

quressa-robinson-literary-agentAbout Quressa: Quressa Robinson joined the D4EO Literary Agency in 2016 and is actively building her client list. Quressa was an acquiring editor at St. Martin’s Press, where she edited both fiction and nonfiction. Her acquisitions include Certain Dark Things (a Publishers Weekly Fall Announcement Top 10 Pick and October B&N Staff Pick) and The Beautiful Ones—both by Locus, World Fantasy, Sunburst, and Aurora Award-nominated author Silvia Moreno-Garcia; Spells of Blood and Kin (which received a starred PW review) by Claire Humphrey; and The Atlas of Forgotten Places by Jenny D. Williams, among others.

She is seeking: Science fiction/fantasy (including speculative/magical realism), nonfiction (celebrity, pop culture, pop science), upmarket and commercial women’s fiction, historical fiction, family sagas, contemporary young adult, and science fiction/fantasy young adult crossover. “I am particularly interested in OwnVoices and inclusive narratives. Genre bending is also great, i.e. epic fantasy romance or upmarket fantasy.”

How to submit: Send all queries to quressa@d4eo.com. Include the first fifty pages of your novel or full proposal and sample chapters as a Word attachment. If the submission is a simultaneous submission, please indicate that in your query. E-mail queries only.

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Writing tip Wednesday: “New Agent to consider”

Paula Munier of Talcott Notch Literary

munierPaula Munier (Talcott Notch Literary)

Notes: “High concept only.”

How to submit: E-query editorial [at] talcottnotch.net with “Query for Paula: [title]” in the subject line.

From their query page http://www.talcottnotch.net/index.php/queries:

What should an ideal query include?

Fiction
Your fiction query should include your genre, such as mystery, science fiction or mainstream, whether the project is for adults or for children, and the length of the complete project in number of words (for example, 86,000 words), not pages. The query should give us a brief overview of the book’s plot and main characters, but does not have to include a complete synopsis. For first-time authors, we do prefer that the project be complete before you query us.

Nonfiction
Your nonfiction query should include your subject area, such as history, biography or business, the main concept of the book, the word count you project the book will be when completed, and your credentials to write the work. Unlike many first novels, many first nonfiction projects do not require that the book be finished before it can be marketed successfully, and we’ll be looking to see that the book proposal and a sample chapter is available here instead. Let us know how long you feel you will take to complete the book. Be realistic with your estimations. It doesn’t matter if you give us an estimate that sounds good if you cannot deliver the book on that date.

Things that Make a Query Stand Out
Hook us in your first paragraph. What’s the most outstanding aspect of your book? Is it your characters’ conflict? Is it your protagonist’s background? Is it the completely surprising revelation you uncovered in your research for your new health book? Don’t assume that you have your entire query to get to your point. If you don’t hook your reader with your opening, your query could get pushed aside.

Show you know your market. Nothing says you haven’t given this a thought better than saying your book is for readers 8-80. But if you say your book is YA and would appeal to readers of two specific writers (particularly if they simply aren’t the two best-known at the moment!) and can even list reasons why, then you’re getting warm.

Don’t forget your ten pages. We ask specifically for the first ten pages of the manuscript and without those, we have to make a decision based solely on the query. Perhaps your query letter isn’t your strongest point, and your voice in your manuscript is amazing? Don’t lose out on the chance to convince us! Just be sure to paste those into the body of the email rather than add them as an attachment.

Things to Avoid In a Query
Don’t stress the fact you are a new writer if you are. Stress your qualifications to write the project and your ability to promote it successfully.

Don’t suggest a book length that is simply not marketable. Research the publishers’ websites, author guidelines and new releases to know what they’re publishing right now.

Don’t quote nice things other people told you when they were turning down your query or book. It might seem like a good idea to tell us that Fabulous Editor X or Amazing Agent Y told you your writing was compelling or your characters were complex, but the next person reading this is going to wonder why that editor or agent didn’t sign the book. In fact, by giving us the quotes from rejections, you’re making the book less appealing, not more.

Avoid insisting the book is going to be a bestseller, even if you feel certain it will be! Let your story and your writing speak for itself.

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Writing tip Wednesday: Agent to consider

New Literary Agent Alert: Maximilian Ximenez of L. Perkins Agency

max_agent-72dpi_5x6_4c-copy

About Maximilian: Maximilian Ximenez grew up within the New York publishing industry. Prior to joining the L. Perkins Agency, he worked at Blizzard Entertainment, creators of the popular Warcraft, StarCraft, and Diablo video game franchises. He is a strong believer in publishing and narrative as a central pillar of franchise and transmedia development.

He is seeking: Maximilian is actively pursuing clients for both fiction and nonfiction works. In fiction, he is acquiring science fiction, fantasy, horror, and thrillers, particularly cyberpunk and neo-noir as well as books with a uniquely deconstructive bent. For nonfiction, Maximilian is seeking popular science, true crime, and books pertaining to arts and trends in developing fields and cultures.

How to submit: For submissions, please send an email to maximilian [at] lperkinsagency.com with your bio, a brief synopsis, and the first five pages of your book or novel in the body.

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Writing tip Wednesday: “New agent to consider”

New Literary Agent Alert: Marya Spence of Janklow & Nesbit

Source: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/new-literary-agent-alert-marya-spence-of-janklow-nesbit?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=wds-csa-nl-160713&utm_content=861700_GLA160713&utm_medium=email

Marya Spence

Marya Spence

Raised in California’s Bay Area, Marya Spence studied literature at Harvard, where she was Fiction Editor for the Advocate and specialized in creative writing. She went on to get her MFA at New York University and teach undergraduate creative writing there. She also spent these years in her 20’s working and interning at The New Yorker, PAPER Mag, Travel & Leisure, Vanity Fair, Publishers Weekly, METROPOLIS Magazine, and more—with a brief stint in equity research.

Currently Seeking: Marya represents a diverse range in fiction and nonfiction, including, but not limited to, literary novels and collections, upmarket commercial fiction, cultural criticism and voice-driven essays, narrative journalism with a humorous or critical edge, and pop culture.

How to Submit: If you would like to submit your work to Janklow & Nesbit, please include the following: For fiction submissions, send an informative cover letter, a brief synopsis and the first ten pages. If you are sending an e-mail submission, please include the sample pages in the body of the e-mail below your query. For nonfiction submissions, send an informative cover letter and a full outline to the address below. Please address your submission to an individual agent. Be sure to include your email address or a return envelope with sufficient postage if you would like your material sent back to you. For e-mail submissions, please send your material to submissions [at] janklow.com.

Janklow & Nesbit Associates
445 Park Avenue
New York, N.Y. 10022

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Writing tip Wednesday: “New Agent to consider”

New Literary Agent Alert: Sarah Manning of United Talent Agency

Source: http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/new-literary-agent-alert-sarah-manning-of-united-talent-agency?utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=wds-csa-nl-160713&utm_content=861700_GLA160713&utm_medium=email

Sarah Manning

Sarah Manning

Sarah first worked at Orion before doing a stint in script development for TV and film. She then moved to become assistant to Juliet Mushens and Diana Beaumont for two years. Twitter: @SarahManning123

Currently Seeking: She is looking to actively build her list and represents both fiction and non-fiction. Sarah’s taste is varied and she enjoys crime, thrillers, historical fiction, commercial women’s fiction, accessible literary fiction, fantasy and YA. She likes big ideas that look at events or characters from new perspectives.

How to Submit: Please send your cover letter in the body of your email, with synopsis and first three chapters as an attachment to:
Sarah.Manning@UnitedTalent.com

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Monday morning writing joke: “The deal”

After an Artist’s Anonymous meeting, three writers were sitting around talking about the upcoming Fourth of July.

“The fireworks have already started at my house,” the first writer said, “The dog died, my wife left me, and the car wouldn’t start and that’s why I was late getting here.”

The second writer shook his head, “Change that car to a truck and you could write a country song about it.”

“No,” the third writer said, “change the car to a dragon and you could have a fantasy story about a dragon who kills a man’s dog and kidnaps his princess wife.”

“Nah,” said the first writer. “I think I’ll leave as it is. The dog’s was my wife’s and the car was in her name. And right about now she’s probably finding out the guy she left me for wasn’t such a bargain, either.”

“Why do you say that?” the other two writers asked.

“Because he was my agent.”

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